MISAKO INAOKA
CURRENTLY SHOWING AT JOHANSSON PROJECTS IN OAKLAND
AUGUST 23-OCTOBER 18
AND COMING SOON TO GALLERI URBANE

In this series, Inaoka continues her exploration of the wilderness, the home, and the space where these two intersect. The artist offers up an alternative scientific theory through her sculptures, in which our influence over the natural world doesn’t lead to endangerment or extinction, but rather an uncanny remodeling of mother nature’s handiwork. 

In Inaoka’s topsy turvy world, where natural patterns and artistically rendered motifs are nearly impossible to distinguish, human influence is less of a threat, more of an opportunity for redesign.

GALLERI URBANE’S JESSICA SIMORTE: ARTIST SPOTLIGHT

FP: How do you get started on a painting? Tell us about your process. 

JS: I use a sketchbook every day to prep for paintings. I like to think of the sketchbook as a sort of daily groundwork that allows for instinct to take over when working on a piece. My process is largely intuitive. I work with a sense of urgency and what doesn’t meet my expectations gets reworked later or discarded. 

FP: What inspires you outside of the studio? 

JS: I find the ultimate inspiration to be other artists. Nothing is better motivation than seeing incredible work made by studio mates. I find that community is crucial.  Visiting artist’s studios is always a rush because you get to see inside their head. I feel the same way about the sketchbook –that’s where the good stuff is.

insidewithin:

I\W: Do you feel like your objects are performing, even without a body inside?

Claire Ashley: Right. That’s what I love about the static ones, the non-dancing ones. There is so much less pressure on them, and they don’t rip as easily. I don’t have to organize people. I am in much more control of them, and I do like the breath of them, or the pressure that people can put against them. A lot of people engage with the work because of the color and the playfulness. I love when people are engaged in a way that they want to touch and get up close and personal unlike most contemporary artwork where you do not touch. I am intellectual in some ways, but I totally appreciate that immediacy that people to respond to the work as well. It becomes an important part of how the work is existing.

(Claire’s studio is located behind her Oak Park home, a space often too small for her large, inflatable creations that tend to spill out into her backyard between plots of tulips. Like the flowers speckling her yard—vibrant yellows, pinks and blues splatter her amorphous objects inciting the innate desire for touch and play.)

OPENING SOON AT GALLERI URBANE: BRETT WESTON RETROSPECTIVE

The exhibition will consist of over 50 photographs drawn from Weston’s fifteen published portfolios, as well as unpublished images from his different subject matter including, White Sands, San Francisco, Baja, Alaska, Hawaii, nudes, abstractions, along with several iconic images including Holland Canal and Garrapata Beach. By looking at the breadth of Weston’s seventy year career, from child prodigy to photographic icon, you see how his work developed overtime and also how his eye remained consistent. 

The exhibit will also illustrate that Brett was a master print maker who took the creation of his prints as seriously as the image itself. This exhibition will illustrate the importance of his work in the canon of photography, and the uniqueness of his modern minimalism.

Opening reception is September 6, 6-8pm.